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Wealthy people will not be kicking you off the train during Final Four

Protesters formed a human blockade during the Super Bowl, when Metro Transit restricted the trains to only those wealthy enough to buy a ticket for the game.

Protesters formed a human blockade during the Super Bowl, when Metro Transit restricted the trains to only those wealthy enough to buy a ticket for the game. Shari Gross, Star Tribune

Metro Transit didn't do much for its reputation during last year's Super Bowl in Minneapolis. Under the guise of security – and U.S. law that says the wealthy get first dibs on everything before for you – only those with a ticket to the game could ride the train.

That meant Monsanto executives could ride in comfort, while the decent people of Minnesota were left to schlep it on their own.

But transit authorities won't be making the same mistake when the NCAA's Final Four comes to U.S. Bank Stadium April 6-8. Consider yourselves now worthy, mass transit patrons. You will still be able to take the train.

Some buses will be rerouted, but there will be extra buses along the Northstar, plus additional buses Friday through Monday.

It's a far more courteous plan than the Super Bowl ban on regular people, which prompted protests and blocked trains over corporate greed. Extended trips to the Mall of America also led to a rather weird objection by mall security VP Doug Reynolds, who emailed Metro Transit to squawk about the homeless people he believed would be dumped at the mall.

Reynolds' “initial response” was to “load all of the people that were left at the MOA in to our vans and deliver them to the Metro Transit office building with a Happy Meal, a blanket, and some hand warmers.

“Mall of America is my team's house,” he continued. “If that sounds dispassionate then I recommend your team show how compassionate they are and set up tents, feeding stations, and the like around your offices and take in people by the train load.”