Minneapolis-St. Paul ties for 'cleanest' city, as voted by people who live there

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Minneapolis does look pretty nice in this photo, but you'd have to get closer to see if it needs dusting. m01229

Either the Twin Cities are among the cleanest metropolitan areas in America, or the people who live here are too polite to say otherwise. 

A recent poll by YouGov finds 90 percent of residents in Minneapolis-St. Paul rate their city as "very clean" or "somewhat clean," a number that ties us with only Dallas-Fort Worth for perceived cleanliness -- which, as you know, is next to perceived Godliness. 

Denver placed third with 87 percent combined "very" and/or "somewhat clean" ratings, followed by Orlando's combined metro area (86 percent) and Miami's (84 percent). 

Some of America's biggest cities bring up the rear: Houston (75 percent), Chicago and New York (both 74 percent), Philadelphia (71 percent), and Los Angeles (69 percent) take up spots 16-20, leading one to think more people packed in one place leads to more stuff on the streets. That, or those cities wind up with bigger problems to solve than sweeping up sidewalks and picking litter in parks.

The Twin Cities' not-so-bitter West Coast rivals Seattle (80 percent) and Portland (78 percent) are either considerably dirtier than we are, or considerably more honest with themselves, which is just the kind of thing they would lord over us, the smug bastards.

YouGov's results don't give anything but those top-line numbers, raising plenty of follow up questions that might be revealing.

How many of us think we're "very clean," and how many said "somewhat clean"? Did St. Paul have different numbers than Minneapolis? What would happen if you asked the people of St. Paul about Minneapolis, and its cleaning habits, and vice versa? 

And most important: Do people who visit us from other cities think we're clean? Suppose we'll find out during next February's Super Bowl in Minneapolis... though we should probably play it safe and just cover everything in snow before they get here.


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